Oh...Sir!! The Insult Simulator - PS4 Review

“Monty Python the game, concerning elderberries and hamster mothers alike”

  • System: Win/Mac/Linux, iOS, Android, PS4, XBOX
  • Publisher: Gambitious Digital Entertainment
  • Developer: Vile Monarch
  • Release Date: May 30th, 2017
  • Pricing: $1.99 (Mobile), $2.99 (PS4)
  • Rating: Unrated
  • Genre: Puzzle, Fighting
  • Players: 1-2
  • Official Website: http://vilemonarch.com/

Who it Caters to

Oh...Sir!! The Insult Simulator is a verbal assault battleground where two players trade quips back and forth. Die hard Monty Python fans will get a kick out of the aesthetics and sense of humor of this game. It’s clear where Polish developer Vile Monarch spent the majority of their time crafting ideas for this game. From the trumpeting asses in the background, to the mentioning of elderberries and insults of immediate family members, it’s all delightfully silly. Stereotypical to a fault, mainly at the expense of old British euphemisms, players who get a kick out the lowest of brow humor delivered with the highest brow class will have a sensible chuckle every now and then.

What to Expect

The game is a “remaster”, if you will, of a title that initially was played on Android and Apple devices. There doesn’t seem to be a lot of difference from playing on a touch screen to controller. In general, the game looks a bit low-res from what you might expect from an HD game, and this is made overly apparent in the menus and settings screens. While playing, it’s not too distracting, but it gives a definite sense that this game was not developed with consoles in mind.

Oh...Sir! The Insult Simulator – Announcement Trailer | PS4


Story

You’re trying to reduce your opponent to an insecure sobbing mess, using whatever zany and outlandish drivel you can spew from your character’s pie hole. No one really asks why fighting game characters are fighting, even if those games supply a story. It’s best to think of this as an extension of your circle of friends’ group chat, and the roasts are out in full blast.

The player can either begin an insulting spree in a one-off 1v1 with an AI opponent, or in a series of five scenarios tournament-style. These scenarios all draw great inspiration from classic skits of the Monty Python series. Finally, the last scenario is a boss fight, with none other than God himself (portrayed by a Morgan Freeman soundalike). Completing the tournament mode allows for new scenarios to unlock, and more characters to use as well.

Gameplay

The game is a back-and-forth insult spree between opponents. Players construct their taunts from a word pool full of abstract phrases. It’s first come first serve, so depending which direction you want to take your jabs, you’ll need to select early. If there’s nothing left in the pool, you may get lucky and find a completing phrase in your arsenal, to be used by pressing either shoulder buttons. If you’re relying on those shoulder buttons, you can press square to sip tea and select new ones. Keep in mind however, you can only use two. Once they are used, your turn is over, and your insult stands as is. Some attempts to complete your insult will, in turn, have the game criticizing your choice of grammar and damaging you by 3 points. If you’re unable to complete your sentence to the game’s satisfaction, your character will be left stammering and do 0 damage. In some rounds, you can select the ellipses option for a Continuation, but this will let your opponent have a free shot at damaging you while your insult is still being built. In this time, if you’re hit by a powerful insult, it will break your concentration and remove words from your insult, rendering all your work for naught.

Throughout an exchange, you can deal Critical Hit damage to your opponent’s weakness based on the words you’ve used. If you do this, it will notify you of those words upon delivering damage, and you can try to hit it again with your next insult if a similar word choice is available. Stringing together longer phrases yields the opportunity to use the same word multiple times and inflict more damage in a Combo sequence. If you do more than 16 points of damage in an attack, it is considered a Rude insult. I imagine that when dealing with human opponents it would be more important to keep an idea of how your opponent will string together an insult from the words available. Even if it ruins their insult, they may pick a phrase just to hinder yours. The AI seems to have its own agenda separate from yours, so it’s easier to make a longer insult against them. Unfortunately, online matchmaking at the time of this review yielded no results, so I could only practice this theory against the AI.

Graphics-wise the game has a very stylized, paper mache cutout kind of look. Based on the inspiration of Monty Python, it works to the game’s advantage. It doesn’t look overly out of place or exceptional, it just fits the type of game this is. The outstanding quality comes from the voice work. For the majority of the spoken phrases, the flow is magnificent. It’s genuinely amusing hearing the phrase you may have just half assedly slapped together delivered so perfectly. After a few times, you find yourself stringing phrases to just hear the outrageousness of them being spoken aloud. The God character, derived specifically from Morgan Freeman’s portrayal, is especially creative in his delivery. Some of the other characters don’t quite say the same words in as effective a way, but each has their own quirks.


Honey's Gameplay Consensus:

The creativity displayed by the developers with how phrases are crafted is to be commended. On occasion, you can get a really good Rude insult with a combo going that could really piss someone off with the right timing. Most of the time, however, it just warrants a smile. This could be a fun party game in the right setting. Although, if you were to go toe-to-toe in the verbal arena with a close friend, you wouldn’t want to use personal details to piss them off. That’d just be outright uncouth.

Unfortunately, the game does get itself confused at times. You will string together a few sentences that deliver a lot of damage but really don’t make any sense. Likewise, you may craft a sentence that makes perfect sense to you but the game doesn’t count it and punishes you. This happened to me once during a playthrough, I imagine that the game has a certain way it classifies some phrases and they can only be used in a certain way.

Honey's Pros:

  • Monty Python aesthetics and humor
  • Voice acting and delivery of lines
  • Inventive ways to craft longer insults
  • Back and forth nature of verbal duels

Honey's Cons:

  • AI is too forgiving
  • Nonsense insults deal massive damage
  • Grows repetitive without the right mood
  • Very few draws to continue playing (weak unlocks, objectives, etc)
  • Noticeably low-res art assets

Honey's Final Verdict:

Ultimately a phone game that got a re-release on HD consoles, it could be a welcome diversion for a group of friends looking to waste time. For anyone who might have already checked out the previous apps and already knows what’s in store, there’s not much reason to make the upgrade. It’s a decent port, but not much else. However, newcomers who are liking the sound of it so far, should give it a try. There have been some impromptu word games in the past, but nothing with this much of a Monty Python look, feel, and vocabulary before. The PC and console ports are arguably the best versions, so it’s worth a shot if you want to kill time.

Hercule SSJ

Writer

Author: Hercule SSJ

What happens when you give a Crunchyroll trial to a former Toonami kid who hasn't watched anime since Cowboy Bebop got dubbed? You get Hercule SSJ. Thanks to that, he's spent the last two years catching up on dozens of shows and manga he's neglected over the years. Has probably watched 60% of all harem ecchi in existence. Currently seeking series to fill the void left by Konosuba and One-Punch Man. Accepts NisiOisiN quotes as payment.

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