A Killer Sandbox Game -- Cube Arts

A Killer Sandbox Game
  • Mangaka : Tomomi Usui
  • Publisher : Seven Seas Entertainment
  • Genre : Action, Fantasy
  • Published : October 2020

Cube Arts Introduction

Sandbox games aren’t for everyone. It’s a fun, laidback genre that allows players to take their sweet time creating whatever they wish. Unlike shooting or PVP games, sandbox games don't have that flashy appeal of dominating the arena, though killing monsters, other players, or creatures isn’t entirely out of the question. Still, other people, who are used to the adrenaline rush-inducing flare, may find it bland and boring. So what if we get trapped in a sandbox game instead of a sword fantasy RPG like that one famous manga? Will it be just fun and easy?

Contains Spoilers


Discussion Time

Cube Arts follows the story of Takuto who has been chosen to be a beta tester of the titular game. Along with his friends, he gets sent a virtual reality device. But when they did log in, they were in for a surprise. One that isn’t nice, but shock-inducing nonetheless. They are trapped in the game, and respawns aren’t the thing. If you’re asking, “Hey, isn’t it just a sandbox game?” Yeah, you’re right. But in Cube Arts, the monsters aren’t completely harmless. Plus, the human psyche may be darker than we have imagined.

Why You Should Read Cube Arts

1. A Deadly Twist to Sandbox

Sandbox games are supposed to be laid back and fun do-your-own-thing gameplay. Well, Cube Arts won’t give you that. Rather, it gives a hellish plot twist to a supposedly child-friendly game. The monsters are terrifying menaces that will spare no player. Think about a slime with a lot of very sharp tentacles. Yeah, that’s exactly what the monster in this series is. On another note, that is also what gives this series a terrifying spice that keeps us on the edge of our seats.

2. A Very Similar Gameplay

Imagine a game wherein the player can do whatever he wants. However, the whole game is completely pixelated. Pixel monsters, pixel creatures, pixel fire, pixel houses, etc. Now, one certain game has probably propped up to your mind. Yeah, we’re talking about Cube Arts. In this game, almost everything works in blocks. Even creating and building things can easily be achieved using miniature blocks. If that sounds familiar, it’s because it is. Even the author admitted of being inspired by the game you’re thinking.


Why You Should Skip Cube Arts

1. Characters Which Seem to Have EQ as High as a Mountain

As you've probably already guessed, the premise of this series is quite similar to Sword Art Online. A group of friends gets trapped in a game world with no second chances. On this one, however, our main characters don’t experience any emotional turmoil. Actually, though, they did. For one panel that is. Worse is that they literally witnessed one of their friends get decapitated right in front of them. Yeah, he’s killed. We’d give it to them, though. They still didn’t know about the no-return thing. Still, they seem so gung ho about it the day after.


Final Thoughts

Cube Arts gives a nasty twist to a fairly simple sandbox game. Nonetheless, we say it’s quite effective. If the aim is to make us question the rainbows and roses most sandbox games are supposed to give us, then the author definitely achieved it. But in terms of giving us good material to read, then this series definitely passes. Maybe just turn a blind eye to the characters’ inability to feel daunt and terror.

Cube-Arts-manga-300x426 A Killer Sandbox Game -- Cube Arts

Writer

Author: Christian Markle

Bio: I am a copywriter, proofreader, and editor. I love watching anime, reading manga, and writing my own stories. Watch out in the future as you may see one of my works one day. Manga and anime were big parts of my childhood. I grew up watching Yu Yu Hakusho, Slam Dunk, One Piece, and Dragon Ball Z. Those were probably one of the happiest and most carefree days of my life. In fact, most of my values are probably molded by manga. No, that's not an exaggeration.

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